Showing posts with label HOCKEY NIGHT IN CANADA. Show all posts
Showing posts with label HOCKEY NIGHT IN CANADA. Show all posts

Monday, 27 May 2013

Body checking in minor hockey needs to be curbed

  To body check. Or not.
Hockey Canada voted Saturday to eliminate body checking until players reach bantam, at aged 13, and it has sparked much debate.
Don Cherry threw his two cents in recently on Coach’s Corner and, not surprisingly, he isn’t a fan. Cherry thinks Hockey Canada is heading down the wrong path. His partner in crime, Ron MacLean, asked an interesting question: should there be two leagues — one for body checking and the other without.
Cherry’s response: “House league is perfect.”

I think Hockey Canada has made the right decision and has a vision for the future of the sport in Canada. Our country and our world isn’t getting any smaller. Unless the National Hockey League expands — and, I certainly don’t see that — the number of kids making the NHL will remain the same: a very small per centage. And that very small number needs to learn the mechanics of body checking. Absolutely.

But for the mass majority — an increasing number— they could very well be interested in playing non-contact recreation hockey — without hitting. And we should be able to have programs in place for hockey in a safe environment. So is learning to hit really that important?

The game has changed. And we need to move with those changes.
Because the most important question on the way home from the rink shouldn’t be whether you won or lost. Rather, are you OK?

Talk to Tait  @camtait on Twitter   Email
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Talk to Tait  @camtait on Twitter   Email
Please give your feedback by clicking a box on the bottom

Wednesday, 1 May 2013

An open letter to Don Cherry

Dear Mr. Cherry:
You seem … unhappy.
You seem … impatient.
You seem … like you’ve had enough.
So could this be your last playoffs, and even your last season being on Coach’s Corner?
I bring this to your attention following your show Wednesday night on Hockey Night In Canada, during the first intermission of the Boston Bruin-Toronto Maple Leaf game.
You poured more fuel on the controversy you evoked Saturday night when you said women reporters do not belong in the dressing room by re-affirming your position.
You seemed frustrated with your co-host Ron MacLean, and, at one point snapped: “Do your job here. Let’s go.”
Coach’s Corner was obviously tight for time at the end of the segment. You were hoping to talk about Minnesota Wild goaltender Josh Harding. When MacLean explained you were out of time, you had an exasperated look on your face.
And just before the camera switched off, you said:
“This is ridiculous. Watch what comes on after.”
I am wondering, in all honesty, if you are getting tired: tired of the grind of every Saturday coming up with something new to say? Tired of … doing the same thing?
You’ve entertained millions of viewers since you first started with 1981 with CBC.
Some love your stuff.
Others … well, they disagree. And your latest controversy on female reporters has certainly awoke people, in and of the game, who aren’t your fans.
But there’s something else very apparent to me.
Especially after Wednesday’s show.
It seemed like work for you. I know, I know: part of the show is to create some friction between you and MacLean. It wouldn’t be as entertaining if the two of you smiled at each other for seven minutes and agreed with one another.
We expect controversy from you.
But I see a deeper level of something from you. I can’t put my finger on it but I really sense something.
Over the years, I have had the pleasure of meeting you and sharing time with you.
The one thing I have always been struck with is what a proud man you are; someone who calls your own number, and creates your own destiny.
I know how much it would hurt you if the powers at be at CBC made the decision for you to go.
This is something you don’t already know.
We all come to a crossroad in life when it’s time to move on. Perhaps you are at that point.
If this is, indeed, your last season, you have earned the right to end things — not for network executives, producers, advertisers or viewers.
But for yourself.